Satellite Observation of our Planetary Environment

While manned space flight has so often captured the world’s attention, it is Earth Observation Satellites which have provided the biggest 'return on investment'. Geostationary satellites provide a bird’s eye view of clouds and storms, while Low Earth Orbiting satellites provide the data which underpins the steady improvement in weather forecasts. But wait, there’s more. Using imaginative Science, we can now use satellites to study plant growth, the all-important ozone layer, greenhouse and pollutant gases, particulate pollution, the Earth’s energy fluxes, ocean productivity, and so much more. Come along and you too can call yourself a rocket scientist with some stunning imagery provided by the lecturer.

DELIVERY MODE

  • Online

COURSE OUTLINE

  • The physics of electromagnetic radiation – light, infrared, etc – which underpins all satellite observation/remote sensing, and also climate.
  • Examples of remote sensing, including vegetation monitoring.
  • Atmospheric profiling to provide the data that drives weather forecast models.
  • The Himawari satellite and its many benefits to Australia.
  • Satellite observation of the ozone layer, threats to it, and the ozone hole.
  • Ocean productivity and health: its role in the carbon cycle.
  • Radiant energy flows and the role of clouds in our climate.
  • NASA's Terra, MODIS, and the A-train satellite constellation.
  • The European Space Agency, and its current plans.
$49 Limited

<p>While manned space flight has so often captured the world’s attention, it is Earth Observation Satellites which have provided the biggest 'return on investment'. Geostationary satellites provide a

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11 Oct
Online Platform
This class is now being delivered Online only for Spring term.

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