King Charles I: The Rise and Fall of His Spectacular Art Collection

In only two decades in the 1600s, Charles I assembled a spectacular art collection of Titan, Holbein, Durer, Rubens and Van Dyck paintings, never seen before in Britain. Art was a currency into his personal Court. Following his trial and execution in 1649 by Oliver Cromwell's Parliamentarians, these paintings played a role in the politics that followed. Art raised money for the Civil war, then became a symbol of Royal extravagance, also signifying religious allegiances. It then became a means to pay off Royal debts, with plumbers, soldiers, drapers and tailors paid in priceless paintings. Recent art research tells this story.

DELIVERY MODE

  • Online

COURSE OUTLINE

  • How Charles I used art to establish his status and position.
  • The role that art played in dynastic marriage negotiations and religion.
  • Ruben’s magnificent ceiling of the Banqueting House, London.
  • The intrigues of the Sale of the Late King’s Goods.
$39 Limited

<p>In only two decades in the 1600s, Charles I assembled a spectacular art collection of Titan, Holbein, Durer, Rubens and Van Dyck paintings, never seen before in Britain. Art was a currency into his

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04 Apr

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