Ways of Seeing: Looking at Art and Architecture

What do we see when we visit a museum and examine a painting or sculpture? Too often we only notice a few things about the work. But there are many questions we might pose: In what ways does it please the eye? Do the colours soothe, or jar? What is a painted scene about and why did the artist choose to present it? And if we view a building, then too we look for a few things: its balance and harmony, the materials used.


Yet even the above are only a few of the things worth noting. This course examines the elements that compose a work of painting, sculpture or architecture – what are sometimes called the “formal elements” - as well as looking at the ways in which visual arts reflect the societies that created the works. The course will draw upon paintings from a variety of western periods and genres as well as examples of sculpture and architecture from a variety of western sites and times.


SUGGESTED READING

  • E. Gombrich, The Story of Art
  • Nikolaus Pevsner, Outline of European Architecture (revised)
  • Rick Steves, Europe 101: History and Art for the traveler


COURSE OUTLINE

  • Aspects of artistic achievement: Technical and design skills; knowledge of materials; awareness of audience; vision; passion
  • Form of the work: Color; Light; Line
  • Principles of design Spatial properties; [in sculpture and architecture] mass; sense of movement
  • Materials used
  • Types of artistic creation, including artistic objects of craft/ use
  • Content of an artistic work: What the artist intended and what we interpret


PLANNED LEARNING OUTCOMES
By the end of this course, students should be able to:

  1. Experience slides and information about great works of art, including paintings, sculpture, and architecture.
  2. Closely examine individual works in order to understand both the many factors that go into artistic creations, and our perceptions and interpretations of those works.
  3. Analyse the artistic principles underlying the arts and the inventions that aided in the creation of some art works, such as the Gothic flying buttress or the use of oil-based paintings.
  4. Examine the relationship of the visual arts to historical studies, and gaining knowledge of the societies that produced particular styles of art.
$75 Limited / $68

<p>What do we see when we visit a museum and examine a painting or sculpture? Too often we only notice a few things about the work. But there are many questions we might pose: In what ways does it

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30 Sep

Interested in this course but can't attend? Please the waiting list.