When did the Roman Empire Die?

By the beginning of the first century BC the Roman Republican Constitution and system of government defined by the Cursus Honorum was under great strain. Very ambitious military leaders found ways to circumvent traditional rules. The rapidly expanding Roman empire also placed great strains on the administration. Civil wars, assassinations, unholy alliances and blatant corruption were obvious throughout the period. Octavian, adopted son of Caesar, styled himself as emperor Augustus from 27 BC. When he died in 14 AD the centre of power was no longer the Roman Forum of the Republic but the Imperial Palace of the Roman Empire.

DELIVERY MODE

  • Face-to-Face

SUGGESTED READING

  • Syme, R. (2002) The Roman Revolution, Oxford Uni Press, ISBN 0192803204
  • Shotter, David, (2005) The Fall of the Roman Republic, Routledge, ISBN 0415319404
  • Plutarch, (2006 edition) The Fall of the Roman Republic : Six Lives, Penguin Classics, ISBN 0140449345

COURSE OUTLINE

  • System of Roman government and the Cursus Honorum in first century BC
  • Legacy of Sulla and is dictatorship 82-79 BC
  • Militarisation of political elections by Pompey, Crassus, Caesar 65-44 BC
  • Violence and assassination as common methods of seizing and maintaining power, including the assassination of Julius Caesar 44 BC
  • Civil Wars 49-48 BC and 31-30 BC and the emergence of Octavian as the first emperor Augustus in 27 BC
  • Key arguments by Roman historians about when and how the Roman Republic collapsed

LEARNING OUTCOMES

By the end of this course, students should be able to:

  1. Gain an understanding of the complexities of first century BC Roman Republican government and its abuses by a succession of soldier/politicians including Sulla, Pompey, Crassus, Catiline, Caesar, Cicero, Mark Antony and Octavian
  2. Discuss several key incidents during the period which clearly illustrate the abuses of the Roman Republican Constitution and their impact on Rome and the empire at the time
  3. Examine the evidence from both modern and ancient historians about significant factors contributing to the collapse of the Republic at some time in the first century BC
$81 Limited / $73

<p>By the beginning of the first century BC the Roman Republican Constitution and system of government defined by the Cursus Honorum was under great strain. Very ambitious military leaders found ways

...
02 Sep

Interested in this course but can't attend? Please join the waiting list by clicking .