Victory Un-won? - Boyne Day and The Orange Order

The Battle of the Boyne polarised Modern Irish History and polarises parts of Ireland still. Can one clash really be all that important? What happened on 'the glorious the twelfth' of July 1690 and what were its consequences? Trace the rise of the Orange movement, world-wide, and modern use of the victory and the uses of history in making (inventing?) history and defining (destroying?) nations.

DELIVERY MODE

  • Face-to-Face

COURSE OUTLINE

  • Introduction - The Battle of the Boyne, 1690: The War of the two Kings - James II and William III - featured the clash by the Boyne Water on 12 July. One of the last pitched battles of the Counter-Reformation, it was indecisive militarily. William III, Prince of Orange, won in the end, and 'Orange' became associated with Protestant supremacy.
  • Development - The Orange Society, 1795: Catholic and Protestant (mainly Presbyterian) farmers and labourers clashed in the ‘Battle of the Diamond in Co Armagh on 21 September. Flushed with pride, the non-Catholic group soon formed the Orange Society. In a generation it became one more powerful element in an increasingly divided community.
  • Heyday - The Orange Order, 1800-2000: Institutional apparatus make a regional Society a national Order. Social, economic but especially political affiliations turn the Order into a force to be reckoned with in Northern Ireland, especially. From ‘Ulster says No’ in the 1790s, to ‘Ulster will be right; Ulster will fight’ in the 1910s, the Order has represented the desires of a strong section of the Northern Irish electorate. The Order spread to many parts of the world, including Australia.
  • Outcome - Orangeism Today: Since the ‘Troubles’ of the 1970s, the Orange Order defined and commanded loyalties, perfecting the polarisation of centuries into both a technique and an immovable force. Parading as a community gesture also worked as a community provocation – depending on the community.
  • Conclusion - The Uses of History: Lessons to be learned from the Orange Order’s development and decline include the power of ideology across time, and the use of history to justify policy.

PLANNED LEARNING OUTCOMES

By the end of this course, students should be able to: 1, Outline the role of the Orange organisation in Irish life and politics over 200 years. 2. Understand the role played by one group in a factious social and political environment. 3. Analyse key issues behind Northern Irish news since the 1970s.

$49 Limited

<p>The Battle of the Boyne polarised Modern Irish History and polarises parts of Ireland still. Can one clash really be all that important? What happened on 'the glorious the twelfth' of July 1690 and

...
12 Jul

Interested in this course but can't attend? Please join the waiting list by clicking .