Freedom's Daughters: The Unsung Heroines of the Civil Rights Movement 1945-1965

$75 Limited inc GST / $68
Freedom's Daughters: The Unsung Heroines of the Civil Rights Movement 1945-1965

<p>Women leaders of the Civil Rights Movement had to battle the male leaders to be heard in the public arena. The most esteemed of the male leaders seemed unconvinced that women had the civil right to

...

If there isn't a class to suit you, please the waiting list.

Women leaders of the Civil Rights Movement had to battle the male leaders to be heard in the public arena. The most esteemed of the male leaders seemed unconvinced that women had the civil right to lead and speak. The courage and competence of the women leaders has been the subject of recent scholarship which highlights the roles played by both black and white women, including Eartha Kitt, Lena Horne and Viola Liuzzo who was shot by the Ku Klux Klan in 1965 in Alabama. Her life was featured in the 2014 film, Selma.


SUGGESTED READING

  • Lyn Olson, Freedom’s Daughters, Women Leaders of the Civil Rights Movement, Scribner, 2003
  • Ed Vicki Crawford, Women in the Civil Rights Movement : Trailbrazers and Torchbearers, Indiana Uni Press, 1993
  • Juan Williams, Eyes on the Prize, Civil Rights Movement, 1954-1965, reprinted 2015 for 50th anniversary of the Civil Rights legislation of 1965


COURSE OUTLINE

  • Early Years of the Civil Rights Movement before 1954 and the role of early women activists
  • Significant milestones in the 1950s and 1960s, Brown Vs Board of Education 1954, integration of schools and universities, desegregation program and violence, opposition from the KKK, Governor George Wallace and white supremacist groups, Civil Rights legislation by President Johnson in 1965
  • Roles of individual women leaders, both white and black including Coretta Scott King, Lena Horne, Eartha Kitt, Ella Baker, Ida B Wells, Xerona Clayton, Nancy Wilson, Rosa Parks, Viola Liuzzo, and Diane Nash, entrenched sexism and misogyny by several male Civil Rights leaders
  • Legacy of the Women Leaders in American and world history including the National Women’s History Museum in Washington DC


PLANNED LEARNING OUTCOMES
By the end of this course, students should be able to:

  1. Gain a sound understanding of the intense 20 year period of the acceleration of the Civil Rights movement 1945-1965 after World War II.
  2. Appreciate the contribution of women leaders and their courage in the face of adversity not only from the violent opponents of Civil Rights but also from their own male Civil Rights leaders.
  3. Discuss how the role of the women Civil Rights leaders is viewed in more recent times.