The Villas of Andrea Palladio

Discover the Palladian Villas of the Veneto and their architect Andrea Palladio. A World Heritage site, these impressive renaissance villas include a variety of styles from farm villas, to grand residences and have influenced architectural design down through the centuries.


COURSE OUTLINE

  • Palladio and the inspiration for the villas: Palladio’s background as a stone mason, his education and his travels and his world.
  • The farm villas – the Villa Emo and the Villa Barbaro: The origins of the Roman villa are to be found in the villa rustica, which comprised both a country residence and a working farm. The Romans idealised the virtuous country life far from the cares and corruptions of the city. Roman senators consciously played the role of country gentleman and this model was well known to renaissance humanists of Palladio’s time. For nobles, churchmen, soldiers and administrators who served the Venetian republic their great estates in the Veneto provided them with an opportunity to live the true aristocratic ideal, as a landed aristocracy.
  • The grand residences – Villa Rotunda and Villa Foscari (La Malcontenta): Just as in Roman times, the villa, as a grand residence, was sometimes almost totally divorced from its agricultural origins. Such a villa suburbana was within close proximity to a town and was surrounded by gardens rather than productive fields. There were few dependent buildings and the emphasis was on making a statement about the power and prestige of the aristocratic owner.
  • Palladio and ‘Palladianism’ in Britain, Germany, Russia and the USA: In the centuries after Palladio’s death his influence survived through his book I Quattro Libri dell’architettura (1570), translated into English and other languages and of course by his buildings which were much visited as part of the Grand Tour. As a consequence his buildings were influential in the 17th and 18th centuries in particular and it is common to talk of ‘Palladianism.’ We consider Lord Burlington’s Chiswick Villa in London, Prince Leopold’s Schloss Wörlitz in Dessau, Charles Cameron’s Pavlovsk palace near St Petersburg, Thomas Jefferson’s Monticello in Virginia and a recent Palladian villa in the Napa Valley, California.


PLANNED LEARNING OUTCOMES
By the end of this course, students should be able to:

  1. Identify the literary sources of Palladio’s understanding of the villa.
  2. Outline the key features of a Palladian villa.
  3. Show a familiarity with the variants of Palladio’s villas – farm residences and palaces.
  4. Identify the allegorical figures in frescoes in the villas discussed.
  5. Identify the key stylistic features of ‘Palladianism’.
$145 Limited / $131

<p>Discover the Palladian Villas of the Veneto and their architect Andrea Palladio. A World Heritage site, these impressive renaissance villas include a variety of styles from farm villas, to grand

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30 Oct

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