Structural (Substantive) Editing

$132 Limited inc GST / $119
Structural (Substantive) Editing

<p>Whereas copy editors feather dust the typescript, structural (substantive) editors refurbish it. Learn what structural editors do; discuss the nature, proportions, elements and arrangement of any

...

Whereas copy editors feather dust the typescript, structural (substantive) editors refurbish it. Learn what structural editors do; discuss the nature, proportions, elements and arrangement of any publication; brainstorm ways to structure an unstructured book; identify the text and non-text elements of two similar books; reorder a group of paragraphs and the entries in a table of contents; suggest ways to structurally improve a school newsletter and a magazine article; and learn to ‘mark up’ – grade headings and code textual treatments.


Please bring a red, blue and green pen; a ruler; a bottle of correction fluid; and an eraser.


COURSE OUTLINE

  • Welcome and introductions. ‘What Do Structural Editors Do?’. Exercise 1: Study a copy of Don Watson’s Death Sentence: The Decay of Public Language. On ruled paper, write down some ways to structurally edit the book. Read and discuss the book review on pages 5 and 6. * ‘A Definition of Structure: The Nature, Proportions, Elements and Arrangement’. ‘Ten Questions to Ask to Make Sure the Patient Is Alive’. ‘A Sample Table of Contents (TOC)’ (from page 39 of The Australian Editing Handbook, Elizabeth Flann and Beryl Hill, John Wiley & Sons, 2004). 'The Three Text Elements of a Book’s Structure'. 'The Four Non-text Elements of a Book’s Structure'. ‘Fiction Books: How Much Editing Is Needed?’.
  • Exercise 2: Tick the structural elements of the two botany books. Use the sample pages from Robinson’s book as a guide.
  • A sample table of contents (TOC) (from a report). Exercise 3: Order the table of contents from the ‘ASEAN’ book in a logical sequence, using blank page 34.
  • Exercise 4: Circle, arrow and number the ‘autobiography’ paragraphs into six chronologically ordered paragraphs.
  • Exercise 5: On ruled paper, list, edit, create and grade subheadings for the school newsletter and suggest ways to improve the layout. Mark up all the subheadings to be in minimal capitalisation (sentence case).
  • Exercise 6: Grade and edit the headings according to the instructions. A form for briefing the designer (desktop operator, typesetter). An edited and styled sample section of a chapter (from The Wounded Breast: Journeys through Cancer, Evelyne Accad, Spinifex Press). Exercise 7: Use a green pen to grade the headings and use different-colour pens or patterns to code the textual treatments for the edited and formatted sample chapter (from a Mission Australia commemorative book). On ruled paper, prepare an explanatory typesetting specification.
  • Exercise 8: On ruled paper, suggest ways to improve the structure of the paragraphs and sentences in the article (from a magazine).
  • Conclusion, and distribution of statements of participation


PLANNED LEARNING OUTCOMES
By the end of this course, students should be able to do as follows:

  1. Identify the structural elements of any publication.
  2. Order text in a logical sequence.
  3. Grade headings and code textual treatments.