South Sudan: Its Colonial Past and Present Challenges

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South Sudan: Its Colonial Past and Present Challenges

<p>In 2011, after a long and destructive civil war with the north, South Sudan became an independent country with great hope and international goodwill. We will examine how the legacy of colonialism

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In 2011, after a long and destructive civil war with the north, South Sudan became an independent country with great hope and international goodwill. We will examine how the legacy of colonialism and some inherent contradictions between a tribal society and a modern nation state may account for its lapsing into a brutal internal wars and consider its future options.


COURSE OUTLINE

  • Nineteenth Century intervention by Britain in Egypt. The Anglo-Egyptian Condominium. Treatment of the newly created Sudan under this arrangement. Reasons for the enmity between northern and southern Sudan. The failure of the changing British policy to adequately prepare the south for the modern world.
  • 1956 Sudan gains its independence with Khartoum firmly in control Outbreak of civil war between north and South. 1972 Collapse of the “Limited Autonomy” arrangement.1983 The Sudan People’s Liberation Army formed. 1005 the Comprehensive Peace settlement.2011.By popular vote of the south the new state of South Sudan is formed.
  • Immediate problems facing the new country. Inherent conflicts between a tribal society and a nation state. Lack of an urban elite. The issue of oil resources. The destruction and disruption of the long civil war period. Limitations of the traditional economic base. Unsettled tribal conflicts in the SPLA. Foreign Aid. A case study of one NGO.
  • Internecine tribal conflicts break out into brutal civil war. The UN and other outside players A consideration of human and natural resources and some scenarios for the future.


PLANNED LEARNING OUTCOMES
By the end of this course, students should be able to:

  1. Have more information on a country where a significant social and political experiment is taking place.
  2. Be more aware of the uneven legacy that British rule has left many African countries.
  3. Have greater sympathy for the challenges that Sudanese members of our migrant population have faced.