Reshaping Democracy: The 19th and Early 20th Century

Consider the political, social and economic forces at work both for and against republican and democratic change in England, France and the USA.


COURSE OUTLINE

  • The complex and often conflicting issues involved in any system of governance. The reform Act of 1872. It’s limited but significant achievements.
  • Social and economic changes in Mid-Victorian Britain and their political impact. The growing acceptance of social reform in both the Whig/Liberal and Tory/Conservative Governments. The ministries of Peel, Disraeli and Gladstone. The Third Reform Act.
  • The Congress of Vienna and the Attempt to impose the old order on Europe. The Revolution of 1830 and the establishment of a Constitutional Monarchy under Louis Phillipe. The unrest of 1848 and the establishment of the Second Republic.
  • Louis Napoleon becomes President and then establishes the new Empire. The Paris Commune and the eventual establishment of the Third Republic.
  • The failure of reconstruction after the Civil War. The Gilded Age-The rise of the Corporations and Trusts. The questionable rulings of the Supreme Court up to the 1900’s.
  • The progressive movement of the early 20th Century. Theodore and Franklin Delano Roosevelt. The New Deal. A new American democracy.


PLANNED LEARNING OUTCOMES
By the end of this course, students should be able to:

  1. Have a greater awareness of the complex and sometimes conflicting issues involved in any system of governance.
  2. Recognize these historical issues still present at work in present-day political issues.
  3. Be aware of how mind- sets or world- views change from one period of history to another and understand the power of these often subconscious views can affect the political conversation.