Ostia, Portus, Rome: The Ports and Markets of the River Tiber

By the 4th century BC, Rome was ready to spread her sails and accumulate her empire. Proper ports needed to be established at the mouth of the River Tiber – first at Ostia and later, to accommodate the growing needs of the city, at Portus. These areas contained temples, shops, baths, houses, public buildings, monuments and necropolis and were host to all the regions, races and religions the Empire had to offer. Enjoy an extraordinary archaeological experience of Rome and her river. We will also discuss Roman trade and the vibrant river port area within the city of Rome itself.

DELIVERY MODE

  • Face-to-Face

SUGGESTED READING

  • Van der Meer, L.B., 2012, Ostia Speaks: Inscriptions, buildings and spaces in Rome’s main port, Leuven
  • Boin, Douglas, 2013, Ostia in Late Antiquity, New York
  • Hermansen, G., 1982, Ostia: Aspects of Roman City Life, Edmonton
  • Meiggs, R., 1973, 2nd ed, Roman Ostia, Oxford

COURSE OUTLINE

  • Origins of Rome in relation to the establishment of the city and the ports at Ostia and later Portus and a brief discussion of other important ports in Italy at the time Rome was establishing its Empire.
  • Geographical information about the source and course of the Tiber River
  • Sites relevant to trade on the Tiber River in Rome itself – marketplaces, roads and bridges.
  • Some exciting excavations near the Tiber River in Rome.
  • Religious areas relevant to the Tiber ports
  • Details of the archaeological sites at Ostia, Isola Sacra and Portus
  • Tour of the archaeological museum at Ostia
  • Brief discussion of the rise of Civitavecchia as the modern port of Rome

LEARNING OUTCOMES

By the end of this course, students should be able to:

  1. Understand the development of several aspects of ancient Rome’s vital infrastructure – bridges, roads, ports and shipping.
  2. Detail the archaeology of the riverside areas of the city used for trade, markets, religion and warehouses – all designed to enhance the visitor’s understanding of the formation of the city and act as a guide for the tourist.
  3. Appreciate the architecture, art, religion and culture of the ancient port areas including the influence of foreign cults.
  4. Comprehend the vital grain trade in relation to the power of the Emperor and Rome.
$158 Limited / $142

<p>By the 4th century BC, Rome was ready to spread her sails and accumulate her empire. Proper ports needed to be established at the mouth of the River Tiber – first at Ostia and later, to accommodate

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31 Jan

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