Nazism: Rise and Success, 1923-1939

How did the Nazis come to power in Germany? How did they consolidate their success? How successful was propaganda? What really were Nazism’s goals and how did they realise them in peacetime before World War II? This course seeks to examine these and other questions, with attention both to how people lived in Germany under Nazism and to the ways historians have studied and explained it. In the course we shall study propaganda materials, art and architecture, and especially film, dealing both with propaganda and with historical fact. Courses on Interwar Europe and on Europe, Nazism, and World War II, will follow.


DELIVERY MODE

  • This class will be delivered online via the online platform Zoom.
  • This course requires students to have an email, a reliable internet connection, a microphone/speakers and access to a tablet, smartphone or computer.


SUGGESTED READING

  • Eric Johnson, K.H. Reuband, What We Knew: Terror, Mass Murder, and Everyday Life in Nazi Germany
  • Victor Klemperer, I Will Bear Witness
  • Jane Caplan, ed., Nazi Germany (Short Oxford History of Germany)
  • George Mosse, Nazi Culture
  • Robert Paxton, Fascism


COURSE OUTLINE

  • The rise and success of Hitler and the Nazi Party in the 1920s and early 30s
  • The attempt to create a totalitarian state
  • The question of who became Nazis, who were supporters, who were bystanders
  • The role of propaganda and theatricality in Nazi success and Nazi rule
  • Early victims: Communists, socialists, trade unionists, Jews
  • The persecution of European Jews in peacetime
  • Resistance before the War
  • Nazi goals and foreign policy during peacetime

Dramatic films discussed after watching segments will include

  • Mephisto – dealing with compromises and careerism in an artist (based upon a true story)
  • Segments of bland entertainment films

Propaganda film segments

  • Leni Riefenstahl, Triumph of the Will – the important propaganda film
  • Hitler Youth Quex
  • Jew Süss


PLANNED LEARNING OUTCOMES
By the end of this course, students should be able to:

  1. Analyse approaches to the study of Nazism, especially with regard to definitions of fascism, and of the importance of German culture and society.
  2. Examine the ways in which the Nazis were masterful in the use of new technology to instill propaganda.
  3. Experience a variety of media as a means to understand history, especially the use of film in this endeavour.
  4. Recognise that Nazi society was complex and included perpetrators and victims, but also those who simply stood by, and those who resisted in a variety of ways.
$250 Limited / $225

<p>How did the Nazis come to power in Germany? How did they consolidate their success? How successful was propaganda? What really were Nazism’s goals and how did they realise them in peacetime

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01 May

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