Nineteenth-Century French Art

Some of the works examined in this series have shaped the trajectory of modern art, design, and advertising. Others are by artists who have often been overlooked or relegated to the margins of art history, despite their embeddedness in the art world while they were alive. This course looks at the life and work of artists whose work defined modern art through the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, and the common themes between them.

DELIVERY MODE

  • Hybrid (F2F and Online simultaneously)

SUGGESTED READING

  • S. Lane Faison. Edouard Manet (Abrams, 1971).
  • Eunice Lipton. Alias Olympia : A Woman's Search for Manet's Notorious Model and Her Own Desire (Cornell University Press, 1993).
  • Catherine Hewitt. Renoir’s Dancer: The Secret Life of Suzanne Valadon (Verso, 2015).
  • Julia Frey. Toulouse-Lautrec: A Life (Phoenix Giants, 1995).
  • Dore Ashton and Denise Browne. Rosa Bonheur: A Life and Legend (Secker & Warburg, 1981).

COURSE OUTLINE

  • Edouard Manet and Victorine Meurent: While Manet is recognised as a pioneer of modern art, Victorine Meurent is often overlooked, despite the part she played in the composition of many of Manet’s most famous works. Both figures will be examined side-by-side, to better put their careers and oeuvres in context.
  • Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec: Best known for his posters and depictions of the underbelly of Parisian life, Lautrec elevated advertising to the level of high art, and used innovative techniques to capture scenes of the modern metropolis. Lautrec’s work captured the zeitgeist of the fin-de-siècle alongside the clichés of the period
  • Suzanne Valadon: The first female artist to exhibit male nudes, Valadon reinvented herself from an artist’s model to becoming an acclaimed artist in her own right, despite being overshadowed by her friends, her lovers, and her son. She was a pioneer in reshaping what constituted “women’s art” and common subject matter, and fused the multiple influences of key art movements in late-nineteenth and early twentieth-century Montmartre in her own work.
  • Rosa Bonheur: The final artist in the series is less avant-garde in terms of her body of work, but is nevertheless a significant figure in nineteenth-century art, thanks to her force of personality and how it suffused her work. Bonheur dodged some rules of the art world while explicitly challenging others through her work and the creation of her public image.

PLANNED LEARNING OUTCOMES

By the end of this course, students should be able to:

  1. Identify key elements of the oeuvre and artistic practice of key nineteenth-century French artists.
  2. Situate the artists’ works and lives within a broader cultural context of Parisian/French life (e.g. artistic bohemia and counterculture, emergent ideas around modernity and the aims of art, concerns faced by minorities or women under French law), and how the artists’ works give voice and form to the issues of their day.
  3. Appreciate the legacy of these artists to the present, and their significance in terms of artistic innovation and their contribution to the cultural milieu of late nineteenth or early twentieth-century France (and Western art in general).
$110 Limited / $99

<p>Some of the works examined in this series have shaped the trajectory of modern art, design, and advertising. Others are by artists who have often been overlooked or relegated to the margins of art

...
25 Aug
$110 Limited / $99

<p>Some of the works examined in this series have shaped the trajectory of modern art, design, and advertising. Others are by artists who have often been overlooked or relegated to the margins of art

...
25 Aug

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