Maoris: The People of the Long White Cloud

$145 Limited inc GST / $131
Maoris: The People of the Long White Cloud

<p>The Maoris have only lived in New Zealand for a relatively short time. But in that time they created a strong and unique culture which has withstood the strains of European settlement better than

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The Maoris have only lived in New Zealand for a relatively short time. But in that time they created a strong and unique culture which has withstood the strains of European settlement better than many but which has still suffered from racial, cultural and economic abuse. This course explores the Maoris before the coming of the “Pakehas”, the white people and how they were treated during their contact period and how they have fared into modern times.


SUGGESTED READING

  • Alan Duff, Maori: the crisis and the challenge
  • Ranginui Walker, Struggle Without End


COURSE OUTLINE

  • We begin by looking at the lifestyle of the Maori people before the European settlers and explorers came. We look at where they came from and what they achieved from the time of the first arrivals around 800AD. Then we go onto look at their lifestyle, their family structures and their internal politics, how they moved from an opportunistic people to a more conservative agricultural people. We look at their attitude towards warfare and the ritualistic place that this had in their culture and belief structures.
  • There are more aspects of Maori lifestyle to be explored such as their fascination with tattooing, their wood carving and their jewellery making. These give pointers to Maori culture. Then the European explorers began to arrive in the region, beginning with Abel Tasman in 1642 and then over a century later, James Cook. Slowly at first, but then quite rapidly, the Maori people began to be influenced by these “Pakehas”, the white men.
  • We look at the first European settlers, people like the missionaries and the whalers and sealers. We look at the dramatic effects that this contact history had on the Maori people, economically, culturally and spiritually. The nineteenth century saw the Maoris move from the Stone Age to the Iron Age. But they were manipulated to turn against each other to provide all manner of saleable items to the Pakeha, including shrunken heads. The bad times culminated in the Treaty of Waitangi in 1840, a treaty which could have delivered good outcomes for the Maori people but which simply created more resentment and anger. Twenty years later the ill-feeling between whites and Maoris led to the Maori Wars, a bloody episode in both British and Maori history
  • After this the Maori people almost succumbed to the weight of numbers. We look at the slow path the Maori people have trodden to rebuild their identity and culture. There have been many successes but the twentieth century created many political and social hurdles that had to be scaled.


PLANNED LEARNING OUTCOMES
By the end of this course, students should be able to:

  1. Understand the origins of the Maoris and their history in New Zealand before the coming of Europeans
  2. Understand their culture and lifestyle, both before and after contact.
  3. Be familiar with the history and effects of contact with Europeans
  4. Trace the development of Maori society as part of a modern New Zealand.