Musical Connections: Western Europe and Russia – Renaissance to Revolution

Explore the fascinating musical-cultural connections between Western Europe and Russia from the Renaissance to the Russian Revolution. Beginning in Tudor England and its diplomatic ties with Moscow. We focus on the introduction of Italian and German music to Russia and its impact, and take account of the grand and study tours of prominent Russians to Western Europe, including such centres as Venice, Vienna, Berlin, Milan, Paris, London, Cambridge.


COURSE OUTLINE

  • England: The courts of Mary I and Elizabeth I and the Grand Duchy of Muscovy: diplomatic and cultural ties: the music of William Byrd, Thomas Tallis, and Peter Phillips
  • Moscow and St Petersburg: 17th century anonymous Russian church music, Bortyansky and church music in the 18th century, the introduction of Italian opera to St Petersburg and the first operas composed in Russian by the Italians Araia, Dall’Oglio/Madonis, Manfredini, and Cimarosa, and the German composer Raupach (born in Stralsund)
  • Venice: The music of Monteverdi, Lotti, Cimarosa, Alessandro and Benedetto Marcello and Vivaldi – celebrations for the visit to Venice in 1782 of the Grand Duke Paul and Grand Duchess Maria Feod
  • Vienna: The visit of the Grand Duke Paul and the Grand Duchess Maria Feodorovna at Christmas 1781 and in October 1782; Haydn’s String Quartets op. 33 and his songs performed for them, and their attendance in Vienna at Mozart’s opera ‘Die Entführung aus dem Serail’ – postscript Mozart’s motet ‘Ave verum corpus’ (1791)
  • Vienna, North Germany and Russia: The artist Caspar David Friedrich and his interest in synaesthesia – the instrumental and vocal music of Schubert – ‘Arpeggione Sonata’ and ‘Mass in A flat’, the overtures of Glinka
  • Russia and England: Tchaikovsky’s visit to England – Cambridge and London: the ‘Serenade for Strings’, the ‘Piano Concerto no 1’, ‘Overture – Francesco da Rimini’, ‘Legend – the Crown of Roses’
  • The music of Scriabin and his interest in synaethesia: His piano sonatas, and Church music in Western Europe and Russia from the late 19th century to World War I and the Russian Revolution: César Franck, Fauré, Stanford, Parry, Charles Wood, Gretachaninov, Rachmaninov, Golovanov, Kalinnikov, Chesnikov, Kedrov, Kastalsky


PLANNED LEARNING OUTCOMES
By the end of this course, students should be able to:

  1. Appreciate the outstanding qualities of the music studied in the course and the fascinating development of the Western musical tradition in Russia.
  2. Evaluate the interaction of Western European and Russian composers during this period.
  3. Discuss the impact of Western culture on Russia at this time.
  4. Develop a clearer idea of the similarities and differences between native Russian musical traditions and the music of Western Europe.
$232 Limited / $209

<p>Explore the fascinating musical-cultural connections between Western Europe and Russia from the Renaissance to the Russian Revolution. Beginning in Tudor England and its diplomatic ties with Moscow

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07 Feb

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