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Landed Squires, Clergy and Military Men: The Male Presence in Jane Austen's Novels

$224 Limited inc GST / $202
Landed Squires, Clergy and Military Men: The Male Presence in Jane Austen's Novels

<p>The men in Jane Austen’s novels live in a larger world than the sedate, gentile world she chose for her settings. Besides being important registers for her strong moral compass they can take us

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The men in Jane Austen’s novels live in a larger world than the sedate, gentile world she chose for her settings. Besides being important registers for her strong moral compass they can take us into the wider, more turbulent England of her times.


COURSE OUTLINE

  • The landed Gentry, their status, obligations and management structures. The enclosure movements and its problems. Changing forms of wealth in England. A quick survey of landed property owners in the Austen novels.
  • Good landlords. Pope’s portrait of a model land lord. Colonel Brandon, Mr Darcy, Mr Knightly, Sir Thomas Bertram. Their moral status in the novels. Less worthy examples.
  • The aesthetics of the country estates. Pope’s views. A comparison of the different attitudes to this issue of different estate owners in the novels
  • The problem of primogeniture as shown in some of Jane Austen novels-Mr Bennet and Mr Collins, Sir Walter and Mr Elliot and Mansfield Park.
  • Clergymen, a profession rather than a vocation. A clergyman’s living and status. The role of the clergyman’s wife. The issue of primogeniture again.
  • A close look at the various clergymen in the novels.
  • The militia in “Pride and Prejudice”, the threat of Napoleonic invasion. History of the Militia and it’s general reputation. Other impacts of the French Revolution on Jane Austen’s family. The English debate on the French Revolution Edmund Burke and Mary Wollstonecraft.
  • “Persuasion” and Jane Austen’s portrayal of naval men. Family connections with the navy.


PLANNED LEARNING OUTCOMES
By the end of this course, students should be able to:

  1. Better understand the social fabric in which Jane Austen’s novels were set.
  2. Recognize the deep moral perspective on which we are expected to judge her characters.
  3. Be more fully aware of the significant historical forces which were undermining the very world she pictures in her novels.