Leonardo and Michelangelo: Florence, Milan and Rome at the Turn of the 16th Century

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Leonardo and Michelangelo: Florence, Milan and Rome at the Turn of the 16th Century

<p>Leonardo da Vinci and Michelangelo Buonarroti fundamentally reshaped the human body in art and its relationship to the natural and metaphysical worlds. From functions of colour and light to debates

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Leonardo da Vinci and Michelangelo Buonarroti fundamentally reshaped the human body in art and its relationship to the natural and metaphysical worlds. From functions of colour and light to debates over the arts' status, the two experimented – often antithetically – with key aesthetic concepts. They set an impossibly high bar for the artists who immediately followed them, and still epitomise the Italian Renaissance in art. While this course builds on our ongoing series, there is no assumption that you have attended previous classes.


SUGGESTED READING

  • Campbell, Stephen J. Campbell and Michael W. Cole., Italian Renaissance Art. Thames & Hudson, 2012. Recent but expensive – try a library
  • Cole, Alison., The Art of the Italian Renaissance Courts. Prentice Hall, 2005. Concise and well-illustrated
  • Hopkins, Andrew., Italian Architecture from Michelangelo to Borromini. Thames & Hudson, various editions. Some sections are relevant to our course
  • Jones, Jonathan., The Lost Battles: Leonardo, Michelangelo and the artistic duel that defined the Renaissance. Vintage, various editions. Readable but take some of the observations with a grain of salt!
  • Kemp, Martin., Living with Leonardo. Thames & Hudson, 2018. Recent, gossipy and informative work from a world expert
  • King, Ross., Leonardo and the Last Supper. Bloomsbury, 2013 and other editions. Good general introduction
  • Paoletti, John T. and Gary Radke., Art in Renaissance Italy. Harry Abrams, various editions. A good general introduction to the period
  • Rosenberg, Charles M., ed., The Court Cities of Northern Italy: Milan, Parma, Piacenza, Mantua, Ferrara, Bologna, Urbino, Pesaro, and Rimini. Cambridge UP, 2010. Scholarly but comprehensive
  • Toman, Rolf, ed., The Art of the Italian Renaissance. Konemann, 1998. Readily available
  • Vasari, Giorgio., Lives of the Italian Artists. Dip in and out online: https://ebooks.adelaide.edu.au/v/vasari/giorgio/lives/ or read Ingrid Rowland and Noah Charney’s recent The Collector of Lives: Giorgio Vasari and the Invention of Art (2017)
  • The Metropolitan Museum of Art (NYC) has a number of relevant books that are entirely available on Google Books (www.books.google.com), including
    • Art and Anatomy in Renaissance Italy (ed. Domenico Laurenza)
    • The Renaissance in Italy and Spain (ed. Frederick Hartt, 1988)
    • Michelangelo: Divine Draftsman and Designer (ed. Carmen C. Bambach, 2017)
    • Painters of Reality: The Legacy of Leonardo and Caravaggio in Lombardy (ed. Andrea Bayer, 2004)
    • Leonardo da Vinci: Master Draftsman (ed. Carmen C. Bambach, 2003)


COURSE OUTLINE

  • Florence under Lorenzo the Magnificent, the later Medici and the last Republic
  • Leonardo da Vinci and his famous classmates in Verrocchio’s workshop
  • Leonardo’s innovations as painter, sculptor and engineer
  • The long echo of Leonardo in Lombard painting
  • Ghirlandaio, Michelangelo and the question of the artist’s biographies
  • Classical antiquity and archaeology in Rome, and the rise of the young Michelangelo
  • Roman Michelangelo: cardinals, popes and the Sistine Chapel
  • Florentine Michelangelo: republican frescoes and statues, reluctant Medici commemoration
  • Michelangelo’s impact on Florence, Rome and Venice
  • Anticipating Raphael, the great synthesist


PLANNED LEARNING OUTCOMES

By the end of this course, students should be able to:

  1. Discuss the main stages of the careers of Leonardo da Vinci and Michelangelo Buonarroti.
  2. Recognise the key changes in the representation of the human body in Italian art, 1460-1560.
  3. Identify major followers of Leonardo and Michelangelo’s style in Mannerist and early Baroque Italian art.
  4. Formally analyse key artworks of the Italian Renaissance.