Language Learning for Seniors: Why You Can and Why You Should

It has long been known that lifetime bilingualism has positive effects on brain health, but more recent work suggests that there are also connections between late language learning and the improvement of key aspects of cognitive function. This is good news for people who would like to take up a language later in life. In this session we discuss the research, as well as considering ways of overcoming negative stereotypes, getting to know more about the possible range of language learning strategies, and how decisions about the best ways to learn may change over the lifespan.

This course will be delivered both face-to-face at WEA Sydney and online via the online platform Zoom simultaneously. Enrolling students need to ensure they have an email, a reliable internet connection, microphone/speakers and access to a tablet, smartphone or computer if they are attending via Zoom or have read the current COVID-19 Safety Guidance that WEA Sydney has put in place before enrolling into the face-to-face class.

$0 Limited

<p>It has long been known that lifetime bilingualism has positive effects on brain health, but more recent work suggests that there are also connections between late language learning and the

...
14 Apr
$0 Limited

<p>It has long been known that lifetime bilingualism has positive effects on brain health, but more recent work suggests that there are also connections between late language learning and the

...
14 Apr

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