They Did Not Rule: Lost Kings and Queens

Succession to the English throne was clearly defined after 1066 but some designated heirs presumptive and heirs apparent did not make it to the throne. Murder, coups, civil war, bitter family rivalry and/or unexpected deaths derailed the succession, sometimes with very dire consequences. Matilda and Edward V are often listed as English monarchs even though they were not crowned as monarchs. Several male Lancastrian and Yorkist heirs met untimely deaths during the vicious Wars of the Roses. Illegitimacy featured as a recurring theme in English and British history in relation to questions surrounding the succession.


This class will be delivered online via the online platform Zoom. Enrolling students need to ensure they have an email, a reliable internet connection, microphone/speakers and access to a tablet, smartphone or computer.


SUGGESTED READING

  • Amy Licence, The Lost Kings, Tudor, Lancaster and York, History Press 2017
  • Simon Schama, The History of Britain, Volumes 1, 2 and 3, BBC Documentary, 2000
  • Daniel Szechi, The Jacobites: Britain and Europe, M U Press, 1994
  • Derek Wilson, The Tower: 1078-1978 – A Thousand Years, Alison and Busby, 1999


COURSE OUTLINE

  • Succession to the throne, primogeniture, heirs apparent and presumptive, Matilda (Maud) dispossessed as rightful heir to Henry I by the barons in the Civil war of 1135- 1141, the eight children of Henry II and Eleanor of Aquitaine and the disputed succession on the death of Richard I in 1199.
  • The coup and Civil War which overthrew Edward II meant there were two crowned kings in England in 1327 until succession issues were resolved . The Wars of the Roses 1455-1487 saw the untimely deaths of Edward of Lancaster, Henry V1, Edward V and his younger brother Richard of York, Edward of Middleham (son of Richard III), Edward Earl of Warwick (son of George, Duke of Clarence, brother of Edward IV and Richard III) and John de la Pole, the Earl of Lincoln (son of Elizabeth, sister of Edward IV and Richard III). The succession was claimed by right of conquest by Henry Tudor at the Battle of Bosworth 148
  • Succession issues in the Tudor and Stuart dynasties, including the will of the dying Edward VI and the accession of the temporary Protestant Lady Jane Grey in 1553, the Protestant challenge to James II in 1685 by the illegitimate son of Charles II, James Stuart, the Duke of Monmouth and the Jacobite challenges to the Hanoverian kings Georges I, II and III in 1709, 1715, 1745 and the 1760s
  • Succession issues in the 20th and 21st centuries in the House of Windsor- Mountbatten


PLANNED LEARNING OUTCOMES
By the end of this course, students should be able to:

  1. Discuss the complex issues surrounding the succession in various periods of English and British history.
  2. Compare and contrast the nature of the resolutions of various succession questions in Mediaeval and Modern history including some European examples by way of contrast.
  3. Appreciate the impact of a selection of succession case studies on the immediate historical periods and in later years.
$145 Limited / $131

<p>Succession to the English throne was clearly defined after 1066 but some designated heirs presumptive and heirs apparent did not make it to the throne. Murder, coups, civil war, bitter family

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19 Oct

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