Japanese Poetry: Haiku Ginko - Writing Zen

$166 Limited inc GST / $149
Japanese Poetry: Haiku Ginko - Writing Zen

<p>Some people wonder how to begin to write. But nobody ever wonders how to begin to walk. If you combined those two things, and let your hand move the way your legs are moving, it is easy. A haiku (

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Some people wonder how to begin to write. But nobody ever wonders how to begin to walk. If you combined those two things, and let your hand move the way your legs are moving, it is easy. A haiku (a Japanese form of short poem) captures a moment in nature. It is a doorway to Zen practice – it’s a way to write what you know. A ginko is a walk in nature, during which your writing hand keeps moving just like your legs. Whatever sights, sounds and smells you experience can transform into a poem. Salt in the air perhaps, or seagulls.


Over five weeks you will learn the fundamentals of the haiku form, and then write your own. We’ll go for two ginkos in a natural setting. You will be shown a way to slow down and observe, to refresh the senses. The walk is graded ‘easy’. Lastly we’ll discuss, edit, and share our work with the other participants, to create an expression of the place. You’ll have time with other writers to discuss and share your reading and your work in an encouraging atmosphere. The pace of this ‘playshop’ is slow and relaxed, with an emphasis on mindfulness.


COURSE OUTLINE

  • What is a haiku? Foundations: The first session will study the history, form and philosophy of haiku, with special emphasis on its founder, Basho. We’ll read his works and those of other classic Japanese writers like Shiki, What is the difference between a haiku and a senryu? The tutor will give instructions for a brief period of zazen.
  • First Haiku ginko: This session takes place outdoors, we will go for a ramble in a city garden that suits the weather. See “Materials needed” for this walk. Students will respond in writing to the natural world around them. We’ll share our work with an informal reading over coffee or tea.
  • Contemporary haiku and feedback: Back in the classroom, the session will study the form and content of haiku these days. Students will bring their own collection of favourites to share. We’ll take a second look at our writings and play around with words and form.
  • Second Haiku ginko: Writing haiku while walking in a park that suits the weather.
  • Final edit and feedback session: We focus on shaping the writings into the haiku form. After polishing, we’ll read our best work aloud to create a joint recital, with a little tea ceremony.

For the outdoor sessions, please bring:

  • Walking shoes
  • Backpack with food and drink
  • Clothing as befits the weather
  • Small notebook & pen


PLANNED LEARNING OUTCOMES
By the end of this course, students should be able to:

  1. learn about the history of the haiku in Japanese literature
  2. learn how the form has changed as it became international
  3. compare haiku with senryu
  4. write some haikus in response to a natural setting
  5. evaluate the quality of own writings – select one’s best work - edit it
  6. evaluate other participants' writing and critique in respectful manner
  7. participate in a group reading – listen and present to an audience
  8. brief introduction to zen meditation