German Resistance Against Hitler: From the White Rose to Operation Valkyrie

$212 Limited inc GST / $191
German Resistance Against Hitler: From the White Rose to Operation Valkyrie

<p>Seventy-five years ago the founders of the ‘White Rose’, the students Hans and Sophie Scholl, who had dared to speak out against the Nazis, were executed by the regime they had defied. Take a

...

Seventy-five years ago the founders of the ‘White Rose’, the students Hans and Sophie Scholl, who had dared to speak out against the Nazis, were executed by the regime they had defied. Take a closer look at the history, motives and legacy of the German resistance against Hitler. Among the topics we will further explore and discuss, are: Elise and Otto Hampel, a working-class couple, who - ‘Alone in Berlin’ - began their own campaign against the Nazi regime, Operation Valkyrie', the failed July 20, 1944 assassination plot, as well as the regime’s fiendish revenge by the 'People’s Court'.


SUGGESTED READING

  • Fallada, Hans, Alone in Berlin (London: Penguin, 2009; first ed. 1947);
  • Kershaw, Ian, Luck of the Devil: The Story of Operation Valkyrie (London: Penguin, 2009);
  • Scholl, Inge, The White Rose: Munich, 1942-1943 (Revised ed., USA: Wesleyan University Press, 1983).


COURSE OUTLINE

  • Introduction: What is ‘resistance’? Was there a unified German resistance movement between 1933 and 1945? Youth against Hitler: The ‘Edelweiss Pirates’ & the 'Swing Kids'
  • Georg Elser and his bomb plot to kill Hitler, 1939
  • ‘Alone In Berlin’ – A working class couple and their campaign against Hitler
  • Hans & Sophie Scholl and the 'White Rose'
  • Dietrich Bonhoeffer and church opposition against Hitler & Count Helmuth James von Moltke and his 'Kreisau Circle'
  • Military opposition: ‘Operation Valkyrie’, July 20, 1944.
  • Review and discussion: The legacy of German resistance against Hitler & Comparison to the ‘Maquis’, the French resistance during the German occupation of France in World War II.


PLANNED LEARNING OUTCOMES
By the end of this course, students should be able to:

  1. Develop a better understanding of Germany’s history in the Twentieth Century;
  2. Gain an awareness of the variety of ways historians approach the past.