Edit This! An Introduction to Copy Editing

$132 Limited inc GST / $119
Edit This! An Introduction to Copy Editing

<p>Ever wondered what copy editors do? They’re the invisible menders who bring documents to an acceptable standard for publication and prevent embarrassing errors from occurring. Their roles include

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Ever wondered what copy editors do? They’re the invisible menders who bring documents to an acceptable standard for publication and prevent embarrassing errors from occurring. Their roles include refurbishment, vacuuming and feather dusting. Come along and learn how copy editors add value to books and other publications, and complete five exercises. Both aspiring and practising editors are welcome!


Please bring a blue, red and green pen; a bottle of correction fluid; a ruler; a pencil; an eraser; and a ruled notepad.


NOTE: There will be short breaks for morning and afternoon tea and a break for lunch – lunch is NOT included.


COURSE OUTLINE

  • 9.15am – 10.15am: Welcome and introductions. Two flowcharts of the publication-production process and a diagram of the editor’s network of contacts. What the author is responsible for and how to present the typescript. What do editors do? The steps for methodically copy editing a typescript.
  • 10.15am – 10.45am: Wearing two hats: when you’re both writer and editor. The standard ‘hard-copy editing’ marks [pages A to G], and tracked changes in Microsoft Word files [pages H to N]. An example of an edited page from a typescript.
  • 10.45am –11.30am: A colour-coded explanation of subject, verb/s and predicate; the nine parts of speech; phrases, transitive verbs and direct objects; and independent and dependent clauses
  • 11.30am–11.45am: Morning tea
  • 11.45am – 12.45pm: Exercise 1: Edit a (partner’s) 100-word piece as directed. How does it feel to write and edit copy? Raising and resolving author queries.
  • 12.45pm – 1.30pm: Exercise 2: Apply specific editorial points: word breaks, hyphens and dashes; italics, roman and quotation marks; paragraph indentation; running on; closing up spaces; numbers; and upper and lower case.
  • 1.30pm – 2.15pm: Lunch (not included)
  • 2.15pm – 3.00pm: Exercise 3: Copy edit the extract from the secondary-school Art textbook (‘Other Media Possibilities’).
  • 3.00pm – 3.45pm: Editorial stylesheets and house-style guides. A sample linear editorial stylesheet. A blank A3-size ‘chart’ editorial stylesheet. Exercise 4: Complete the multiple-choice exercise about style and convention.
  • 3.45pm – 4.00pm: Afternoon tea
  • 4.00pm – 4.30pm: The differences between copy editing and proofreading. A case study: The edited and marked-up typescript, first proof and finished products for ‘Kerry Kulkens’ Guide to Love, Sex and Your Stars'.
  • 4.30pm – 4.45pm: Exercise 5: Complete the spelling test. A glossary of the terms used in the publishing industry. Reference books for editors and writers.
  • 4.45pm: Conclusion, and distribution of signed statements of participation

NOTE: For pre-course homework, please type a 100-word piece headed ‘My Strengths and Weaknesses as a Writer’. Please use an A4-size page, double space the printout and bring the printout to the session.


PLANNED LEARNING OUTCOMES
By the end of this course, students should be able to do as follows:

  1. Describe the editor’s role in the publication-production process.
  2. Outline the differences between editing and proofreading.
  3. Explain why consistency of editorial style is essential.
  4. Apply the standard marks used in hard-copy editing.