Exploring the Bible as Literature

The King James Bible of 1611 was produced by a committee; it is a translation from three ancient languages, Hebrew, Aramaic and Koiné Greek. Its 66 ‘books’ have multiple authors, were written over many centuries and include a variety of literary forms, yet the work has remarkable artistic unity. Its phrases have become part of everyday language – we use expressions like ‘David and Goliath’, ‘den of thieves’, ‘the blind leading the blind’ and many others without realising their source.

This class will be delivered face-to-face at WEA Sydney. Enrolling students need to ensure they have read the current COVID-19 Safety Guidance that WEA Sydney has put in place before enrolling.

COURSE OUTLINE

  • Predecessors of the KJV. Its origins and later revisions. Studying the text as literature rather than as history or theology.
  • Story-telling with a purpose 1. Plot -- heroic narrative, epic history
  • Story-telling with a purpose 2. Characterisation -- tragedy and comedy.
  • Biblical poetry – psalms, hymns and acclamations
  • Singular literary forms – proverbs, gospels, parables, epistles . . .
  • Visionary or apocalyptic literature; unifying elements in the 66 books.

PLANNED LEARNING OUTCOMES

  1. Identify and respond to the variety of literary forms in one of the best-known works of English literature.
  2. Apply some techniques of literary scholarship to texts often quoted for historical or theological purposes.
  3. Recognise distinctive understandings of ‘imagination’, and ‘truth’ in religious literature.
$192 Limited / $173

<p>The King James Bible of 1611 was produced by a committee; it is a translation from three ancient languages, Hebrew, Aramaic and Koiné Greek. Its 66 ‘books’ have multiple authors, were written over

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29 Apr

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