Europe, Nazism and War 1939-1946

This is not a military history class. It focuses on European social, economic and political systems, Nazi plans for expansion and extermination, and the effects and outcomes of World War II. This course seeks to examine these and other questions, and the ways historians have studied and explained them. In the course we shall study propaganda materials, art and architecture, and films dealing both with propaganda and with historical fact.


DELIVERY MODE

  • This class will be delivered online via the online platform Zoom.
  • This course requires students to have an email, a reliable internet connection, a microphone/speakers and access to a tablet, smartphone or computer.


SUGGESTED READING

  • Eric Johnson, K.H. Reuband, What We Knew: Terror, Mass Murder, and Everyday Life in Nazi Germany
  • Victor Klemperer, I Will Bear Witness
  • Jane Caplan, ed., Nazi Germany (Short Oxford History of Germany)
  • George Mosse, Nazi Culture
  • Robert Paxton, Fascism
  • Mephisto, Rosenstrasse, Sophie Scholl: The Final Days, and segments of entertainment and propaganda films such as Jew Süss


COURSE OUTLINE

  • Why did the Nazis plan for war from the beginning of the regime?
  • How did European countries respond to the Nazi threat?
  • Why did Nazi policy become radicalised once the war began?
  • How widespread in Europe was anti-Semitism?
  • How did the Holocaust come about and how did it function?
  • In what various ways did Europeans and Germans try to resist Nazism and its war machine?
  • How was Nazi Germany defeated, and how did the Allied occupation function?


PLANNED LEARNING OUTCOMES
By the end of this course, students should be able to:

  1. Examining right-wing European parties, and failures of democracy in many states.
  2. Analysing approaches to the study of Nazism, especially with regard to those dealing with Nazi ideology of war, growing radicalism and the situation of Jewish Germans.
  3. Examining the ways in which the Nazis fought the war and administered Fortress Europe.
  4. Examining the Holocaust in terms both of Germany and of occupied lands.
  5. Exploring the situation after the Nazi defeat and occupation by the Allies - “Zero Hour”.
  6. Experiencing a variety of media as a means to understand history, especially the use of film in this endeavour.
  7. Analysing the countries of occupied Europe with reference to their support or resistance to Nazism.
  8. Recognising that Nazi society was complex and included perpetrators and victims, but also those who simply stood by, and those who resisted in a variety of ways.
$250 Limited / $225

<p>This is not a military history class. It focuses on European social, economic and political systems, Nazi plans for expansion and extermination, and the effects and outcomes of World War II. This

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24 Jul

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