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Dangerous Ideas in History

$162 Limited inc GST / $¤,146
Dangerous Ideas in History

<p>Throughout all History radical thinkers have challenged the status quo, in science and technology, medicine, politics and government, literature, film and the arts, religion or belief systems and

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Throughout all History radical thinkers have challenged the status quo, in science and technology, medicine, politics and government, literature, film and the arts, religion or belief systems and warfare. The suffragettes were considered dangerous because they demanded to be heard and recognised in public spheres. Socrates was condemned to death in 399BC because he was considered a danger to the youth of Athens. The dangerous ideas of Charles Darwin continue to inspire passionate debates 160 years later. Galileo spent the last ten years of his life under house arrest and was tortured by the Inquisition for advancing the dangerous idea of heliocentrism.


SUGGESTED READING

  • John Brockman, What is Your Dangerous Idea?, Simon and Schuster, 2007
  • Really Dangerous Ideas: What Does and Doesn’t Matter?, Collection of essays from Sydney’s Festival of Dangerous Ideas, Connor Court 2013
  • Mike Walsh, Dictionary of Dangerous Ideas, Amazon, 2014


COURSE OUTLINE

  • Deposing/killing of an anointed ruler, the politics of regicide e.g. Richard II, Edward II, Charles I, James II
  • Challenging the power of the Catholic Church, Copernicus, Galileo, William Tyndale, Martin Luther
  • The Welfare State, nationalisation and socialism for the “common good” e.g. Britain post 1945, USSR post 1917
  • Votes for women, eligibility of women for university, public office and political leadership, e.g. USA, Britain, USSR
  • 21st century dangerous ideas, e g drone warfare, connectivity of all media, euthanasia, marriage equality


PLANNED LEARNING OUTCOMES
By the end of this course, students should be able to:

  1. Compare and contrast the essential features of several dangerous ideas throughout ancient, mediaeval and modern history
  2. Discuss the motivations of the radical thinkers and the evidence available in each case study
  3. Assess the short term and longer term impact of the dangerous ideas throughout history