Disabling and Accommodating Worlds - The History of Disability in NSW

Australian society historically has often seen people living with disability through a Medical model - as having something ‘wrong’. However, the Social model of a simple need for accommodations, continues to evolve. Without community-wide adaptation of appropriate resources, many Australians experienced a disabling society full of barriers. The fascinating history of removing some of those obstacles deserves to be more celebrated. Who was the first Deaf convict? How did Auslan evolve from British and Irish Sign Language? Who were the first gold medal Paralympians? Did the International Year of Disabled Persons achieve anything lasting?

DELIVERY MODE

  • Face-to-Face

COURSE OUTLINE

  • Medical Model and Social Model
  • Deaf people: Convicts and sign language, The School for Deaf and Blind Children, The School for Deaf Girls (Waratah), Oralism vs sign language, Cochlear implants
  • Blind people: The Deaf and Dumb Institution, Alice Betteridge and Roberta Reid, Blind sports
  • People with intellectual conditions: Colonial asylums, Hospitals and Homes, Spastic Centre
  • People who use wheelchairs: 19th century, Invalid Pension 1908, First World War, House with No Steps, International Year of Disabled Persons

LEARNING OUTCOMES

By the end of this course, students should be able to:

  1. Identify some of the key Australian figures in creating educational, legal, and social opportunities for different communities of people with disability.
  2. Apply an understanding of the differences between the Medical and Social Models to various policies over time.
  3. Outline the key events and shifts in attitudes in the history of disability rights.
$67 Limited / $60

<p>Australian society historically has often seen people living with disability through a Medical model - as having something ‘wrong’. However, the Social model of a simple need for accommodations,

...
20 Jun

Interested in this course but can't attend? Please join the waiting list by clicking .