Celebrating Great Music

Last year, in 2021, ABC Classic FM held its annual top 100 countdown. The topic was ‘music you can’t live without’. In response, this series looks at the top 6 pieces and gives the historic background to each and an analysis of the music featuring works from Beethoven (twice), Elgar, Vivaldi, Vaughan Williams and Handel.

DELIVERY MODE

  • Face-to-Face

COURSE OUTLINE

  • The Emperor Concerto: Beethoven’s Piano Concerto No5 in Eb Major op 73 was written between 1809-1811 in Vienna and dedicated to Archduke Rudolf. The Emperor is one of the most accomplished of all piano concertos, with a striking opening movement and a glorious rondo finale, but it is the beauty and serenity of the hymn-like adagio which makes it one of Beethoven’s best. In this class we will be exploring the history of this piece and looking at what makes it quite so special.
  • Beethoven Symphony No 9: The nineth symphony is one of the greatest works in the classical repertoire, regarded as the pinnacle of Beethoven’s achievements and a culmination of his genius. Written between 1822-1824, it is remarkable not only for its grandness of scale but also being the first composition from a major composer to use voices, the Ode to Joy from Friedrich Schiller.
  • Ralph Vaughan Williams – The Lark Ascending: Ralph Vaughan Williams is one of the great English composers. Rooted in the past, he believed that it was essential to understand one’s own national music; its traditions and melodic development in making a personal style. The Lark Ascending, written in 1914, was inspired by a poem by George Meredith where the violin becomes both the bird song and its flight.
  • Vivaldi – The Four Seasons: These are a group of four violin concerti each giving musical expression to the seasons of the year. Composed around 1718, they were a total revolution in musical conception. Included with each concerto is a sonnet which is represented musically, line by line, including flowing creeks, singing birds and barking dogs.
  • Elgar – The Enigma Variations: Although Elgar is regarded as a typical English composer, most of his musical influences were not from England but the Continent instead. The genesis of his Enigma Variations began when he was tinkering on the piano imitating various friend’s characteristics. The unveiling of each of these friends was one of the enigmas..although there are other ‘enigmas’ as well.
  • Handel – Messiah Oratorio: In 1741 Handel was sent the libretto for a new oratorio based on the Messiah. Completing it in just 24 days, it was a great hit when it was first performed in Dublin but not so when it was then performed in London. By the time of his death in 1759 it was his most performed oratorio.

LEARNING OUTCOMES

By the end of this course, students should be able to:

  1. Identify some major compositional ideas from each piece.
  2. Explain the piece’s historical significance.
  3. Discuss the different influences that inspired each composer.
$198 Limited / $178

<p>Last year, in 2021, ABC Classic FM held its annual top 100 countdown. The topic was ‘music you can’t live without’. In response, this series looks at the top 6 pieces and gives the historic

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21 Feb

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