Capturing (Difficult) Truth in Memoir

$149 Limited inc GST / $134
Capturing (Difficult) Truth in Memoir

<p>If life is a puzzle and if each of us represents one small piece of this puzzle, then we owe it to life, we owe it to ourselves and most importantly we owe it to each other to capture the colours

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If life is a puzzle and if each of us represents one small piece of this puzzle, then we owe it to life, we owe it to ourselves and most importantly we owe it to each other to capture the colours and contours of our life. When we write the truth – even the most difficult truth and especially the most difficult truth – we give a gift to ourselves and to others, we leave a legacy behind that will last beyond all the minor and major loves, losses and learnings of our one lifetime.


COURSE OUTLINE

  • Capture your story in a way which will interest others. Learn and use preferred writing styles and techniques such as active voice and 'show, don’t tell'. Find out why writing your memoir in chronological order only works if you are a celebrity.
  • Unravel the truth without crucifying friends or being sued by your enemies. Define what is ‘truth’ and learn why truth resonates with readers like nothing else can. Discover how to protect yourself when others argue with your version of the truth.
  • Learn when to montage moments and when to go into minute detail. Less is sometimes more and less is sometimes less. Sometimes highlighting the highs and lows is enough, while other times writing all the details, including the who, what, where, when, why and how is vital to writing a truthful story which helps others.
  • Opportunities to read your writing. Rarely do writers get an opportunity to read their difficult truth in a safe and confidential setting – this is one of those rare opportunities.


PLANNED LEARNING OUTCOMES
By the end of this course, students should be able to:

  1. Evaluate the best way to include difficult truth and connect with an audience without disconnecting from family, friends and colleagues.
  2. Know the difference between ‘telling’ and ‘showing’ a story.
  3. Develop a regular writing pattern and a network of fellow writers.
  4. Contact proofreaders/editors and publishers.