Thanks for adding:

Proceed to Checkout

Continue browsing

X

Aboriginal History

$162 Limited inc GST / $146
Aboriginal History

<p>An introduction to the history of Australian Aboriginal people from the perspective of autonomous history. Any history of policies and laws pertaining to Aboriginal people will be inadequate unless

...

An introduction to the history of Australian Aboriginal people from the perspective of autonomous history. Any history of policies and laws pertaining to Aboriginal people will be inadequate unless we take into account what Aboriginal people have said about living with those policies and laws, how they saw things and what kind of changes they thought were possible.


SUGGESTED READING

  • E. Lawford and others, Raparapa, Broome, 1989.
  • A. Heiss, Am I Black Enough for You, particularly the history of Redfern, Bantam, 2012.
  • J. Miller, Koori a Will to Win, Sydney, 1982 – this is a film as well as a book.
  • L. Hercus, P. Sutton, This is What Happened, Canberra, 1986.
  • P. Read, Down There with Me on the Cowra Mission, Canberra 1986.
  • Gary Foley’s Koori History Website has numerous articles, photographs and film.
  • Lionel Fogerty’s poetry online: http://www.poetrylibrary.edu.au/poets/fogarty-lionel
  • The Australian Museum’s Aboriginal Gallery.


COURSE OUTLINE

  • Country – the meaning of country and how the term is used for diverse groups. Victoria, NSW, WA, Queensland, Palm Island, NT. The sources listed above will assist with your exploration of this concept. Native Title and country. Indigenous knowledge.
  • Autonomous History – a method of looking at history which clears our minds of sets of prior understandings. We will work through the process of understanding autonomous history. Looking critically at history. The Killing Times – differing interpretations.
  • Toyotas, Cards and Sugar – Incorporation of European technology, goods, pastimes. Aboriginal inventors and inventions. Law. History. Art.
  • Mission, Station, Government Policy – how these affected different country. Dog tags, managers, schools. Underground politics. Right to speak.
  • Political structures – links between different groups, organizations. Civil Rights. Land Rights.


PLANNED LEARNING OUTCOMES
By the end of this course students should be able to

  1. Understand Aboriginal perspectives on history.
  2. Comprehend autonomous history and know how to apply it.
  3. Understand some of the ethical issues involved in negotiating Aboriginal knowledge systems.