L. M. Montgomery: Anne of Green Gables and Other Orphans

$107 Limited inc GST / $96
L. M. Montgomery: Anne of Green Gables and Other Orphans

<p>In Anne of Green Gables, Lucy Maud Montgomery created one of the most loved characters in literature. Montgomery was contributing to the rich trope of the orphan heroine, and so we will also visit

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In Anne of Green Gables, Lucy Maud Montgomery created one of the most loved characters in literature. Montgomery was contributing to the rich trope of the orphan heroine, and so we will also visit Heidi, Pollyanna, Rebecca and Judy Abbott, to explore why these characters were created and how they have been understood.


SUGGESTED READING
Any novels by any of the five authors eg:

  • Montgomery, Lucy Maud: Anne of Green Gables, Rilla of Ingleside, Emily of New Moon, Pat of Silver Bush, The Story Girl etc
  • Spyri, Johanna, Heidi
  • Porter, Eleanor H., Pollyanna
  • Wiggin, Kate Douglas, Rebecca of Sunnybrook Farm
  • Webster, Jean, Daddy-Long-Legs, Dear Enemy


COURSE OUTLINE

  • 19th century Australian writers for children
  • Lucy Maud Montgomery’s life: childhood
  • Anne of Green Gables: origins, writing
  • Previous literary orphans: Heidi by Johanna Spyri, Rebecca of Sunnybrook Farm by Kate Douglas Wiggin
  • Lucy Maud Montgomery’s life: success, romances
  • Emily of New Moon: autobiographical elements
  • Montgomery’s influence on literary orphans: Pollyanna by Eleanor H. Porter
  • Lucy Maud Montgomery’s life: marriage, illness
  • Pat of Silver Bush: autobiographical elements
  • Story Girl: autobiographical elements
  • Lucy Maud Montgomery’s life: war, sons, a changing world
  • Literary descendant: Daddy-Long-Legs by Jean Webster
  • Death and Legacy
  • The Orphan as interpreted by Montgomery, Spyri, Wiggin, Porter and Webster


PLANNED LEARNING OUTCOMES
By the end of this course, students should be able to:

  1. Describe the life story of each of these writers, their cultural contexts and influences, characters, creative works and r other contributions and their impact.
  2. Assess their books according to literary quality, significance and influence, themes they explored, and their meanings at the time, and today.
  3. Discuss similarities and differences between the writers, responses to the authors' personal characters and decisions, the figure of the Orphan in children’s literature, and how these authors interpreted it.
  4. Remember with pleasure what these books meant to them, growing up.
  5. Want to read and re-read those books.