Archaeology, Artefacts and Ancient Technology

$108 Limited inc GST / $97
Archaeology, Artefacts and Ancient Technology

<p>Trace the journey of the fascinating remnants of ancient human life from their discovery in archaeological excavations to their display in museums and collections. Personally examine and analyse a

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Trace the journey of the fascinating remnants of ancient human life from their discovery in archaeological excavations to their display in museums and collections. Personally examine and analyse a wide variety of genuine ancient and quality museum replica artefacts in “hands-on” sessions. Discover how the study of archaeology and artefacts enriches our research into history – and ourselves.


SUGGESTED READING

  • Albaanese, M., Domenici, D., Ferrero, G, Maggi, S., 2010, Archaeology from Above, Vercelli, Italy - Tutor’s Note: I got a copy of this wonderful “coffee table” book very inexpensively (about $30!) from Basement Books – located near the Devonshire St tunnel at Railway Square. This is a great source of inexpensive books on archaeology and history. Books by George Gerster likewise contain brilliant and very revealing photos of archaeological sites taken from hot air balloons.
  • Alcock, S. and Osborne, R., editors, 2007, Classical Archaeology, Malden
  • Amiet, P., 1980, Art of the Ancient Near East, New York
  • Beazley, M., 1988, The World Atlas of Archaeology, London
  • Biers, W.R., 1996, The Archaeology of Greece: an introduction, Ithaca
  • Drewett, P., 2011, 2nd edition, Field Archaeology: an introduction, New York
  • Renfrew, C., and Bahn, P., 4th ed. 2004, Archaeology: Theories, Methods and Practice, London – an old standard for university text and still imprint, constantly updated and often available 2nd hand at places like Berkelouws.
  • Rose, M, Boon-Muller, E, Ferrero, G., 2010, Great Discoveries in Archaeology, Vercelli, Italy
  • Schultz, R. and Seidel, M., 1998, Egypt: The World of the Pharaohs, Köln
  • Smith, M.E., 2012, The Comparative Archaeology of Complex Societies, New York
  • Vergo, P., editor, 1989, The New Museology, London


COURSE OUTLINE

  • Archaeological method – how we find and excavate artefacts and human remains, what archaeology tells us about the past, and the methods and ethics of collecting and displaying them.
  • What we can learn from studying ancient pottery – “hands-on” session with ancient pottery fragments
  • How ancient people made things – materials and technology in the ancient world, and how to handle museum objects - “hands on” session with real ancient and museum quality replica artefacts
  • The history of archaeology – its development from treasure hunt to science - looking also at some famous archaeologists and their discoveries along the way including Belzoni in Egypt, Layard at Ninevah, Schliemann at Troy and Mycenae, Evans at Knossos, Montet at Tanis, Woolley at Ur and Fiorelli at Pompeii. * The course will also include information on how the student can find and join in archaeological excavations and be excellent basic preparation for anyone planning to do this.


PLANNED LEARNING OUTCOMES
By the end of this course, students should be able to:

  1. Have a basic understanding of archaeological techniques
  2. Qualify artefact types and materials
  3. Understand some of the technologies used by ancient societies to produce artefacts and the sources of their raw materials – and with this gain some knowledge about geography and trade in the Mediterranean world
  4. Comprehend some of the important ethical issues surrounding the collection and display of artefacts and organic remains, and know how to handle museum objects properly.
  5. Understand the origins of archaeology – its development from treasure hunt to science.
  6. Gain an insight into some of the fascinating, complex and (sometimes) devious personalities involved in archaeological society over the past two centuries.